CONTINUEThis site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.
  1. Front Page
  2. News By Topic
  3. USTR Reports To Congress On China's WTO Compliance

USTR Reports To Congress On China's WTO Compliance

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

31 December 2013


Following the United States-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) in Beijing earlier this month, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) has released its 2013 annual report on China's compliance with its World Trade Organization obligations, as was statutorily mandated by Congress in 2000.

The report highlights the status of China's policies and practices in areas such as intellectual property rights, industrial policies, services, agriculture and transparency, in addition to the main focus of the report's analysis that continues to be on trade concerns raised by US stakeholders that, in the view of the US Government, merit attention within the WTO context.

It is pointed out that trade has expanded dramatically among China and its many trading partners, including the US, since China joined the WTO in 2001. US exports of goods to China totalled USD110bn in 2012, representing an increase of 476 percent since 2001 and positioning China as the US's largest goods export market outside of North America (after Canada and Mexico).

However, it is reported that, "despite these remarkable results, the overall picture currently presented by China's WTO membership has remained complex, largely due to the Chinese Government's interventionist policies and practices and the large role of state-owned enterprises in China's economy."

"This heavy state role in the economy, reinforced by unchecked discretionary actions of Chinese government regulators," the report adds, has "generated serious trade frictions with China's many trade partners, including the US."

The report also confirms that, when trade frictions have arisen, the US has preferred to pursue dialogue with China to resolve them, but that, when dialogue with China has not led to the resolution of key trade issues, the US has not hesitated to invoke the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism.

Since China's accession to the WTO, the US has brought 15 WTO cases against China, more than twice as many WTO cases as any other WTO member has brought against China. "In doing so," the report concludes, "the US has placed a strong emphasis on the need for China to adhere to WTO rules, holding China fully accountable as a mature participant in, and a major beneficiary of, the WTO's global trading system."

The JCCT is the main forum for addressing bilateral trade issues and promoting commercial opportunities between the US and China. Working groups meet throughout the year to address topics such as intellectual property rights (IPR), agriculture, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, information technology, tourism and commercial law. In fact, the USTR announced key outcomes in the areas of IPR, government procurement and regulatory obstacles from its latest meeting.

TAGS: compliance | tax | law | intellectual property | World Trade Organisation (WTO) | China | United States | standards | regulation | trade | services | North America

To see today's news, click here.

 















Tax-News Reviews

Cyprus Review

A review and forecast of Cyprus's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Cyprus Review »

Malta Review

A review and forecast of Malta's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Malta Review »

Jersey Review

A review and forecast of Jersey's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Jersey Review »

Budget Review

A review of the latest budget news and government financial statements from around the world.

Visit Budget Review »



Stay Updated

Please enter your email address to join the Tax-News.com mailing list. View previous newsletters.

By subscribing to our newsletter service, you agree to our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.


To manage your mailing list preferences, please click here »