CONTINUEThis site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.
  1. Front Page
  2. News By Topic
  3. Japan To Give Tax Breaks To Forest Owners

Japan To Give Tax Breaks To Forest Owners

by Mary Swire, Tax-News.com, Hong Kong

19 December 2001


In an effort to preserve privately owned undeveloped land and forests in national and quasinational parks, the Japanese Environment Ministry Tuesday decided to introduce tax breaks for owners who allow certain organizations and local governments to manage their property for them. Under the new system, landowners would sign agreements with local governments or nonprofit organizations involved in nature preservation management.

Landowners who sign what is tentatively called a "landscape preservation agreement" will pay less inheritance tax and no land-holding tax, according to the ministry: "Private land in national and quasinational parks tends to be developed because of its natural surroundings. Also, the government's development standards are less strict for such land, making it even easier for owners to develop it," said an official.

National and quasinational parks are grouped into five categories according to the density of their forests, with each category having different development regulations concerning deforestation, construction and other factors.


To see today's news, click here.

 















Tax-News Reviews

Cyprus Review

A review and forecast of Cyprus's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Cyprus Review »

Malta Review

A review and forecast of Malta's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Malta Review »

Jersey Review

A review and forecast of Jersey's international business, legal and investment climate.

Visit Jersey Review »

Budget Review

A review of the latest budget news and government financial statements from around the world.

Visit Budget Review »



Stay Updated

Please enter your email address to join the Tax-News.com mailing list. View previous newsletters.

By subscribing to our newsletter service, you agree to our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.


To manage your mailing list preferences, please click here »